2001 - Redevelopment of Old Psychiatric Hospital

Redevelopment of Old Psychiatric Hospital

In the simplest and most common meaning of the word “re-using” a building refers to a change in its purpose, sometimes connected with a change in structural layout and, almost always, an intensifying of its functions. This vast building, covering approximately 11,000 square metres of built-on area and courtyards, comes from the old Domus Dei Hospital, later known as S. Antonio Abate Hospital, built between 1296-1320, and used as a civil hospital, orphanage and asylum. The project identifies a transition phase from being a “closed” connective system to an “open” network by setting up “penetrating links”; the interior spaces on the ground fl oor will interact with the outside spaces of the city, thereby creating a unifi ed set of inseparable relations. The areas look different in terms of their centrality, nature and quality, but will actually form a set of public spaces.

LOCATION: Teramo, Italy
YEAR: 2001


2001 - Cavour Central Square

Cavour Central Square

When designing the central square in one of the most distinctive of all coastal towns (Martinsicuro in the province of Teramo), the idea was to revive and re-establish the true meaning of a town square. It is basically a paved platform planted with 16 specimens of Palma Washingtonia filifera, all 5 metres high; the decision to introduce this geometric island of greenery is connected with the more general idea of contemporary design, according to which greenery is not just or exclusively autochthonous, but also functional to the underlying design idea. The same landscaping system, due to its potential double symmetry, also provides a backdrop for another system, designed in close relation to the church building, as if to recreate a sort of “grassy square”, and which, in line with current thinking on social interaction, provides an area for indulging in socio-recreational activities, such as meetings, musical entertainment and practical performances.

LOCATION: Martinsicuro (TE), Italy
YEAR: 2001


2000 - Cybersite Headquarters

Cybersite Headquarters

LOCATION: Firenze, Italy
YEAR: 2000


1996 - FLOM

FLOM

Project concept: to design a “viral work of architecture”. The project report states that: “New buildings must not be like those old-fashioned nihilistic creations. They must expand as if they were new invasions of mass, like viruses infiltrating and brutally growing inside host organisms. As in the case with Cubist paintings and icons, there is no distinction between background and form, decoration and figure.” The centre stands in a densely packed residential area dominated by tall buildings. Architectural quality derives from the direction in which the lot is set and extreme compression of available space. The size of the project site and limited budget called for a rational layout composed of four geometric interpenetrating “masses”. The building is also set out to accommodate future extensions. The main hall, set at the tip of the triangular-shaped lot, creates a sort of “water garden”. Special attention has been focused on the openings, which, as regards the vertical closures, are “excavated” from the outside but “controlled” from the inside.

LOCATION: Martinsicuro (TE), Italy
YEAR: 1996


1995 - LFDF Social Center

1995

Project concept: to design a “viral work of architecture”. The project report states that: “New buildings must not be like those old-fashioned nihilistic creations. They must expand as if they were new invasions of mass, like viruses infiltrating and brutally growing inside host organisms. As in the case with Cubist paintings and icons, there is no distinction between background and form, decoration and figure.” The centre stands in a densely packed residential area dominated by tall buildings. The 2,000 sq.m triangular-shaped lot is set between three roads. Architectural quality derives from the direction in which the lot is set and extreme compression of available space. The size of the project site and limited budget called for a rational layout composed of four geometric interpenetrating “masses”. The building is also set out to accommodate future extensions. The main hall, set at the tip of the triangular-shaped lot, creates a sort of “water garden”. Two vanishing points over by the gardens, created out of full-height glass windows and two concrete walls, conclude the space. Two cubes (changing rooms and barkitchen) and a conical trunk (restrooms) are wedged into the main structure of the recreation hall, creating a sort of superfetation; the spaces are not arranged hierarchically and the premises blend into the landscape. The layering of spaces creates transversal relations; the outside premises recall those on the inside, thanks to the use of the same materials and colour. Each “mass” is carefully underlined by a single colour, thereby helping emphasize the virile aggregation of the overall construction. Special attention has been focused on the openings, which, as regards the vertical closures, are “excavated” from the outside but “controlled” from the inside.

LOCATION: San Benedetto del Tronto (AP), Italy
YEAR: 1995